Reverend Drury Worsham Blankenship, 1825-1894

Biography

Drury Worsham Blankenship, 1825-1894
Drury Worsham Blankenship, 1825-1894

The Reverend Drury Worsham Blankenship was my great-great-grandfather. A devout Man of God, he was a preacher in the Cumberland Presbyterian Faith. He was at the time of his death the pastor for four different congregations. He was born in Russell County, Kentucky to Drury Blankenship and Mary Johnson on December 3, 1825 and died in Hardin County, Tennessee on October 30, 1894. He married Nancy Louisa J. Ferguson on January 16, 1850. They had ten children together.  Nothing I can say would be adequate enough to highlight his life pass what was stated about him in his obituary.

He preached with greatearnestness and power.  He died at his post and with the armor on.  He had been in the ministry fifty years and had held many revivals, and multitudes have professed religion under his ministry.  He had held several revivals the past summer and fall, and but few men will bemissed more than he in their field of labor.

I am greatful that his teachings to his daughter Betty Elizabeth Blankenship were passed along to my grandmother Versie Gertrude Jones (52 ancestors in 52 weeks #2). Those teachings continue on to this day.

1830 U.S. Federal Census

The 1830 Census for Russell, Kentucky lists Drury Blankenship as follows:

(1) White males under 5

(3) White males ages 5 – 9

(1) White male ages 10  14

(1) White male age 15  19

(1) White male age 40 – 49

(2) White females under 5

(1) White female ages 10  14

(1) White female age 30  39 (Mary Johnson)

(9) White persons under 20

(2) White persons ages 20 – 49

(11) Total members of household.

Source Citation: 1830 US Census; Census Place:  , Russell, Kentucky; Page: 105; NARA Series: M19;Roll Number: 41; Family History Film: 0007820.

1840 U.S. Federal Census

The 1840 Census for Russell, Kentucky lists Mary Blankenship as follows:

(1) White males ages 5 – 9

(1) White male ages 10 – 14

(1) White male age 15 – 19

(1) White female under 5

(2) White female ages 10 – 14

(1) White female age 40 – 49

(6) White persons under 20

(1) White persons ages 20 – 49

(7) Total members of household.

Source Citation: Year: 1840; Census Place: Hardin, Tennessee; Roll: 522; Page: 268;Image: 546; Family History Library Film: 0024544.

1850 U.S. Federal Census

January 10, 1850 Census for 12th Civil District in Hardin County, Tennessee lists D.W., age 24, born in Kentucky. His occupation is listed as __Clergyman and his real estate is valued at $66.00. He is enumerated with his wife Nancy L.J, age 20, born in Tennessee.

1860 U.S. Federal Census

September 17th, 1860 Census for 12th Civil District in Hardin County, Tennessee lists D.W. Blankenship, age 34, born in Kentucky. His real estate was valued at $2,200 and his personal property was valued at $3,900. He is enumerated with his wife, Louisa J, age 30, born in Tennessee. Also enumerated with him is his children; Doogell F, age 8, Mary H., age 6, Wm H C,, age 3 and Elizabeth age 2. All of their children were born in Tennessee. He lives next to his brother Able Blankenship and his wife and children.

Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: District 12, Hardin, Tennessee; Roll: M653_1254; Page: 373; Image: 189; Family History Library Film: 805254.

Ministry Record for 1860’s

D. W. Blankenship – Saltillo, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1868, page 104

D. W. Blankenship – Saltillo, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1869, page 83

1870 Agriculture Census of Hardin County. Tennessee.

The 1870 Agriculture Census of Hardin County, Tennessee, shows that they have 100 improved acres, 90 acres of unimproved woodland with a cash value of $1500. As of June 1, 1870, they owned 1 horse, 2 mules, 5 milk cows, 5 other cattle, 9 sheep, 14 swine with a total value of all livestock being $750. During the year ending June 1, 1870, they had produced 148 bushels of spring wheat, 375 bushels of Indian corn, 30 bushels of oats, 2 bales (450 lbs each) of cotton, 10 lbs of wool, 50 bushels of Irish potatoes, 30 bushels of sweet potatoes, 100 lbs of butter. The value of animals slaughtered or sold for slaughter was $320 and the estimated value of all farm productions was $990.

1870 U.S. Federal Census

June 20th, 1870 Census for 12th Civil District in Hardin County, Tennessee lists Doura Blankenship, age 44, born in Kentucky. His occupation is listed as a farmer. His real estate is valued at $2,100 and his personal property was valued at $1,000. He is enumerated with his wife Nancy, age 40 who is the homemaker. Also enumerated with him is his children, Douglas, age 18, who works on the farm, Henry, age 13, who also works on the farm; Elizabeth, age 11, Lucinda, age 9, Eliza P, age 8, Drury, age 6 and James R., age 1. All children have been born in Tennessee as well.

Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: District 12, Hardin, Tennessee; Roll: M593_1534; Page: 469A; Image: 272; Family History Library Film: 553033.

Ministry Record for 1870’s

D. W. Blankenship – Saltillo, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1870, page 78

D. W. Blankenship – Saltillo, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1871, page 78

D. W. Blankenship – Saltillo, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1872, page 119

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1873, page 96

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1874, page 95

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Purdy Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1875, page 84

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1876, page 90

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1877, page 85

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1878, page 93

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1879, page 89

1880 U.S. Federal Census

June 8th, 1880 Census in 12th Civil District in Hardin County, Tennessee lists Drewry W. Blankenship, age 54, born in Kentucky with both parents being listed as born in Virginia. His occupation is listed as a farmer. He is enumerated with his wife Nancey L.J., age 50 born in Tennessee with her father born in Virginia and her mother born in Tennessee. Also enumerated with him is his children, Lousindy A., age 19, Drewry A., age 16, James R., age 12, and Joseph B., age 4. All of their children listed were born in Tennessee.

Ministry Record for 1880’s                

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1880, page 116

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1881, page 88

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1882, page 118

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1883, page 127

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1884, page 116

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1885, page 131

The following is a list of the Congregations,Sunday-schools, and Missionary Societies, by Presbyteries, that have contributed through the Board during the year, showing amount contributed by each for Home and Foreign Missions separately, and the total for both; also giving the name of the pastor of each congregation. — Annual Report of the Board of Missions of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Spring Hill – Rev. D.W. Blankenship – Foreign Missions,$7.50

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1885, page 65

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1886, page 160

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1887, page 157

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of West Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1888, page 169

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of Tennessee

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1889, page 177

Ministry Record for 1890’s

D. W. Blankenship – Sardis, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of Tennessee

Pastor – Liberty Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Pastor – Spring Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1890, pages 124 & 226-228

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of Tennessee

Pastor – Spring Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1891, pages 138 & 244

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of Tennessee

Pastor – Spring Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1892, pages 145 & 254

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of Tennessee

Pastor – Mount Sharon Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Pastor – Spring Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Pastor – Union Grove Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1893, pages 147 & 254

D. W. Blankenship – Coffee Landing, Tenn.

Minister – Madison Presbytery – Synod of Tennessee

Pastor – Liberty Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Pastor – Mount Sharon Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Pastor – Spring Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Pastor – Union Grove Cumberland Presbyterian Church

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1894, pages 162 & 264-266

D. W. Blankenship – Madison Presbytery – 1895

Mortuary List – Ministers

Source: Minutes of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1895, pages 19 & 157

Obituary

 Drury Worsham Blankenship

1825 – 1894

According to J.T.White in The Cumberland Presbyterian dated December 27, 1894, Drury W.Blankenship professed religion at thirteen years of age and joined the Cumberland Presbyterian Church at Old Union; joined the presbytery soon after, was licensed at eighteen and ordained at twenty-five years of age.   In a book entitled Short Life Sketches of Some Prominent Hardin Countians by Andrew P. Hitt, it states that It is believed that he conducted more funerals and officiated at more marriages than any other minister in the county.  He began to preach at the extremely early age of 14.  The Savannah Courier newspaper records and Hardin County records show that Rev. Blankenship officiated at many funerals and weddings. Cumberland Presbyterian records show that Rev. D.W. Blankenship served from 1868 – 1872 as minister of Madison Presbytery, Synod of West Tennessee at Saltillo. From 1873 – 1889 he served at Coffee Landing. In 1890 and 1891 he was pastor at Liberty Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Sardis and Spring Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Coffee Landing.  In 1892, he was still the pastor at Spring Hill. In 1893 he pastored 3 churches – Mount Sharon, Spring Hill and Union Grove.  In 1894, Rev. Blankenship was the pastor for Liberty Cumberland Presbyterian, Mount Sharon, Spring Hill and Union Grove, all of the Madison Presbytery, Synod of West Tennessee.

The Cumberland Presbyterian printed the following obituary for Rev. Blankenship:

Rev. D.W. Blankenship, a faithful and devoted minister of the gospel, member of Madison Presbytery, died of typhoid fever, October 30, 1894, at his home near Cravens Lodge, Hardin County, Tennessee, after about four weeks illness.  He stated in his last suffering that the Savior was nearer than ever before.  The fifth Sunday in September he preached at his home church, Antioch, and was then so nervous and feeble that he could barely stand, after which he went home, took to his bed and was never up again.  He preached to the young converts from text, Building on the Rock, emphasizing the importance of building, growing and working for the Master.  He preached with great earnestness and power.  He died at his post and with the armor on.  He had been in the ministry fifty years and had held many revivals, and multitudes have professed religion under his ministry.  He had held several revivals the past summer and fall, and but few men will be missed more than he in their field of labor.  He was a pioneer man with good natural ability and a good share of piety, but with few educational advantages.  A good man, a good preacher, and presented Bible truths with force.  He professed religion at thirteen, and joined the Cumberland Presbyterian Church at Old Union; joined presbytery soon after, was licensed at eighteen, and ordained at twenty-five years of age.  He was born December 3, 1825. His father died when he was a small boy.  He was reared by a widowed mother, who had several other children, and but little to depend on except her Savior and her own firm will.  On January 16, 1850, he married Miss Louisa Jane Ferguson who still survives him.  All the children are now professors of faith.  Brother Blankenship was for many years a mason.  He was buried at Liberty, one of his congregations.  Brother Blankenship got but little compensation for his preaching, but still he preached faithfully, and labored for his own support and to raise his family.  Rev. J.R. Alexander preached the funeral from 2 Timothy IV: 7, 8: I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, and I have kept the faith; henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, etc.

 Written by J.T. White – Paulk, Tennessee, Source: The Cumberland Presbyterian, December 27, 1894, page 15

Memorial Service by the Church

The committee on deceased ministers made a verbal report stating that since our last meeting Rev. D.W. Blankenship had passed over. They asked permission to make their report at the fall meeting, when the family of Bro. Blankenship could be present and a memorial service could be had.

Source: Minutes of Madison Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, March 8-11, 1895,page 17

The special order of this hour was the memorial service tobe held in honor of our departed Brother, Rev. D.W. Blankenship.

Rev. W.J. Williams preached an appropriate sermon from Job 14:14: “If a man die will he live again? All the days of my appointed time will I wait until my change come.”

After the sermon appropriate and feeling remarks were made by many members of the presbytery, testifying to the great worth and usefulness of Bro. Blankenship to the church.

Source: Minutes of Madison Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, September 20-23, 1895, page 26

Find A Grave

Memorial #15619427

Drury Worsham Blankenship was born December 3, 1825 in Adair County, Kentucky and died October 30, 1894 in Hardin County, Tennessee. He is the son of Drury and Mary “Polly” Johnson Blankenship. Husband of Nancy Louisa Jane “Janie” Ferguson Blankenship. He died near Craven’s Lodge in Hardin County, Tennessee. He was buried in Liberty Cemetery, Crossroads in Hardin County, Tennessee.

Land Grant of John A. Kendrick, 1845

In 1845 my great-great-great-grandfather, Dr. John A. Kendrick made a purchase of 200 acres of land in McNairy County, Tennessee for a total of $25.00. He passed away in 1850 and the land was sold as per direction of his will.  One day I may find someone that will know precisely were the land was so that I can stand on the land that my ancestor cultivated near the end of his life.

The 1845 Land Grant in McNairy County, Tennessee for John A. Kendrick.
The 1845 Land Grant in McNairy County, Tennessee for John A. Kendrick.

The State of Tennessee:

No. 1050

TO ALL TO WHOM THESE PRESENTS SHALL COME – GREETING.

Know we, that for and in consideration of the sum of twelve and one-half cents per acre, paid into office of entry taker of McNairy county, and entered on the 13th day of November 1844 pursuant to the provisions of an Act of General Assembly of said State, passed on the 11th day of January, 1842, by No. 7113 THERE IS GRANTED by the said State of Tennessee, unto

John A. Kendrick

A certain tract or parcel of land containing two hundred acres by survey bearing date the 3rd day of February 1829 lying in said county, in range 4 & 5 section 3.

Beginning on a state and 2 hickories 48 pols North and 76 pols West of the 2 mile ____ that stands North of the S.E. & S.W. corner of said Section Runs Thence East 252 Pols ___ Hickory and Ber Oak pointer thence South 127 pols to a Hickory & White Oak Point___ thence West 252 pols to a Hickory Be__ ____ & Hickory Pointing thence North 127 pols to the beginning.

With the hereditaments and appurtenances. To have and to hold the said trace or parcel of land, with its appurtenances, to the said John A. Kendrick and his heirs forever.

In witness whereof, James C. Jones Governor of the State of Tennessee, hath hereunto set his hand and cause the Great Seal of the State to be affixed, at Nashville, on the 20th day of May in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Forty 5 and of the Independence of the United State the Sixty 9th.

By the Governor:

 James C. Jones

Jno. S. Young

Secretary of State

 

 

Versie Gerturde (Jones) Kendrick 1900 – 1978

Biography

Versie Gertrude Jones Kendrick
Versie Gertrude Jones Kendrick

My paternal grandmother Versie Gertrude Jones was born on January 8th, 1900 in Stantonville Tennessee to James Lafayette Jones and Betty Elizabeth Blankenship. She would become the matriarch of our branch of the Kendrick Family. Versie came from a huge family as both of her parents had previously been married and both had started families with their respective spouses. Once together James and Betty would go on to have six children together.

In December of 1916 she married my grandfather, James Lacy Kendrick. She would have a daughter born of an affair and  two biological sons by James Lacy.  My father is the youngest of her three children.

She passed away when I was barely three months old. My mother and father  told me that after I was born she embraced my mother and father and told them she was ready to go home, that they had someone to love. She was suffering from cancer at the time. While I never knew her personally she was someone that the stories painted bigger than life. For most people they have that one person that they wish they could meet and spend time with. For me she is that person. What I would not give to have a seat at her Sunday dinner table and taste the still famous chicken and dressing recipe passed along to future generations.

Mrs. Kendrick's China Cabinet, Butter Churn, Walking Cane
Mrs. Kendrick’s China Cabinet, Butter Churn, Walking Cane

In the picture above is her china cabinet, and majority of 50’s glassware, butter churn and walking cane. All of which have a prominent placement in my dinning room, however, she has a very prominent place in my heart.

1900 U.S. Federal Census

June 13th, 1900 Census for Tenth Civil District in McNairy County, Tennessee lists Versa Jones, age 5 months, born in January 1900 in Tennessee with both parents born in Tennessee. She is enumerated with her parents, James L., age 39 and Elizabeth, age 40. She is enumerated with her half siblings, brother, Clarence Brown, age 18, and sisters, Leander, age 16 and Maudie, age 14. Completely biological siblings included, Oscar, age 9, Henry, age 8, Annas, age 4 and Detrus, age 2.

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Civil District 10, McNairy, Tennessee; Roll: 1586; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 0083; FHL microfilm: 1241586.

1910 U.S. Federal Census

May 3, 1910 Census for District Number 10 in McNairy County, Tennessee lists Versa Jones, age 10, born in Tennessee with both parents born in Tennessee. She is enumerated with her parents Jim L., age 48, born in Tennessee and Bettie J., age 41, born in Tennessee. She is also enumerated with her siblings; Annas, age 15, Detras, age 12, Willie, age 6. Her and her siblings have attended school since September 1, 1909.

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Civil District 10, McNairy, Tennessee; Roll: T624_1511; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 0143; FHL microfilm: 1375524.

Marriage Bond

Know all Men, That we, Lacy Kendrick of the County McNairy and State of Tennessee, are held and firmly unto the State of Tennessee in the sum of

TWELVE HUNDRED AND FIFTY DOLLARS

to which payment, well and truly to be made, we bind our heirs ,executors and administrators, and each and every one of us and them, both jointly and severally, firmly by these presents.

That whereas, Lacy Kendrick hath prayed and obtained a License to marry Versie Jones.

Now, if the said Versie Jones be an actual resident in the County aforesaid and there shall not heretoafter appear any lawful cause why the said Lacy Kendrick and Versie Jones should not be joined together in Holy Matrimony as husband and wife, then this obligation to be void and of no effect; otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

Witness our hands and seals, the 19th day of December, 1916.

Lacy Kendrick (seal)

Sam Patrick (seal)

Marriage License

State of Tennessee, McNairy Coutny.

To any Minister of the Gospel having the care of Souls, Jewish Rabbi, Justice of the Peace of said County, Judge, or Chancellor – Greeting:

You, or either of you, are hereby authorized to solemnize the RITES OF MATRIMONY between Lacy Kendrick and Versie Jones

he said Lacy Kendrick, having given bond and security agreeably to the Act of General Assembly in such case made and provided.

Given at the Clerk’s office of said County, this 19th day of December, 1916.

Noah Prince

County Court Clerk.

I solemnized the Rites of Matrimony between the within named parties on the 24th day of December, 1916

W.S. Burks

M.G.

Source Information: Ancestry.com. Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008. Original data: Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002. Nashville, TN, USA: Tennessee State Library and Archives. Microfilm.

1920 U.S. Federal Census

January 20th – 21st, 1920 Census on Shiloh Battlefield Road in Civil District No. 10, McNairy County, Tennessee lists Versie Kendrick, age 20, born in Tennessee with both parents listed as born in Tennessee. She is renting her home and is enumerated with her husband, James, age 34, born in Tennessee. Both Lacy and Versie are able to read and write. They are living next to James’ maternal grandmother, Martha Ray and aunts Florence James and Donie May.

Source Citation: Year: 1920; Census Place: Civil District 10, McNairy, Tennessee; Roll: T625_1753; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 138; Image: 780.

1930 U.S. Federal Census

April 17, 1930 Census Island 37, 11th Civil District of Tipton County, Tennessee lists Versie Kendrick, age 30, born in Tennessee, with both parents also born in Tennessee. Her age at first marriage is listed as 16. Enumerated with her is her husband, her daughter, Mary E., age 4 years and 3 months also born in Tennessee. They live next too Versie’s brother Oscar Jones and his wife Nancie and their children.

Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place: District 11, Tipton, Tennessee; Roll: 2282; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 24; Image: 1094.0; FHL microfilm: 2342016.

1940 U.S. Federal Census

April 15, 1940 Census Little River Township, Poinsett County, Arkansas lists Versie Kendrick, age 40, born in Tennessee. She is enumerated with her husband J.L., age 55; children, Mary Elizabeth, age 14, James Ray, age 8, and Robert J., age 5. Five year prior the family lived in rural Poinsett County, Arkansas.

Source Citation: Year: 1940; Census Place: Little River, Poinsett, Arkansas; Roll: T627_162; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 56-11.

Find A Grave

Memorial #112096955

Thomas Benton Kendrick 1843 – 1924

Biography

My great-grand-uncle Thomas Benton Kendrick was born on May 7, 1843 in Tennessee to Thomas and Sarah (Carothers) Kendrick. He grew up in McNairy County. He would at the age of 20 join the Confederacy to defend the South during The American Civil War. At the age of 26 he would marry his wife, Francis Isabelle Anderson, of what would be a 42 year long marriage giving them 5 children; Margaret M., Ida M., James William, Dora Isabelle, and Emmett Albert. Thomas was a farmer who was self-employed. Thomas passed away on April 27, 1924 in McNairy County. He was buried in Old Clear Creek Cemetery outside of Stantonville on April 28, 1924.

1850 Census: U.S Federal Census

December 6th, 1850 Census Tenth District in McNairy County, Tennessee lists Thomas Kendrick, age 7, born in Tennessee, parents listed as both born in Tennessee. He is listed as having attended school within the year. Enumerated with him is his parents Thomas, age 35, and Sarah, age 30, Kendrick; siblings John , age 10, Ann, age 5, and James, age 2.

Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: District 10, McNairy, Tennessee; Roll: M432_888; Page: 125A; Image: 255.

1860 Census: U.S Federal Census

September 13th, 1860 Census District Number 10 in McNairy County, Tennessee lists Thomas B. Kindrick, age 17, born in Tennessee, parents listed as both born in Tennessee. He is listed as having attended school within in the year. Enumerated with him is his parents, Thomas, age 46, and Sarah, age 39, Kindrick; siblings, John A., age 19, Sarah A., age 15, James A., age 12, Lucinda, age 9, Matilda, age 7, Mary, age 5, George, age 4, and Henry D., one month old.

Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: District 10, McNairy, Tennessee; Roll: M653_1262; Page: 473; Image: 546; Family History Library Film: 805262.

The American Civil War Period

According to the muster roll for the Co. E, 18 (Newsom’s) Tennessee Cavalry he is listed as a Private in the confederacy and that he  enlisted on June 10, 1863 in Franklin County, Alabama by Capt. Wisdom for the period of 3 years or the war. He was last paid according to the muster roll by Capt. Lindsey on January 1, 1864. Thomas Benton Kendrick filed for a pension (#11096) for his service during the Civil War.

Muster Roll, Thomas Benton Kendrick
Muster Roll, Thomas Benton Kendrick

Civil Ware Muster Roll for Thomas Benton Kendrick

More on the 18th Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry (Newsom’s)

Overview: 18th Cavalry Regiment [also called 19th Regiment] was organized in May, 1864, by consolidating six companies of Newsom’s Tennessee Cavalry Regiment and four companies of Forrest’s Alabama Cavalry Regiment. Its members were recruited in Hardeman, Madison, Henderson, and McNairy counties. The unit was assigned to T.H. Bell’s Brigade in the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana. In Mississippi it sustained 22 casualites at Brice’s Cross Roads and 95 at Harrisburg. Later the regiment was active in Tennessee and in March, 1865, was consolidated with the 20th Tennessee Cavalry. It moved to Alabama and on May 3, the 18th/20th contained 29 officers and 217 men. The next day they were included in the surrender of the department. The field officers were Colonels John F. Newsom and Dew Moore Wisdom, Lieutenant Colonel Joseph D. Ozier, and Majors William Y. Baker and William T. Parham.

Source Information: National Park Service. U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: National Park Service, Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System, online <http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/&gt;, acquired 2007.

Marriage of Thomas Benton Kendrick and Francis I. Anderson

November 16th, 1869 a marriage license was granted to T.B. Kendrick and Miss. F.I. Anderson was granted a marriage license by R.M. Thompson, clerk of McNairy County, Tennessee. There were married the same day by R.W. Michie.

Source Information: Ancestry.com. Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.  Original data: Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002. Nashville, TN, USA: Tennessee State Library and Archives. Microfilm.

1870 Census: U.S Federal Census

August 15, 1870 Census Tenth Civil District of McNairy County, Tennessee lists Thos. B. Kindrick, age 26, born in Tennessee. His occupation is listed as a farmer. His personal estate is valued at $250.00. Enumerated with him is his wife, Francis I., age 24, born in Alabama. Her occupation is listed as keeping house. He is living two doors down from his parents Thomas and Sarah Kindrick and six doors down from his brother John A. Kendrick and his wife and children.

Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: District 10, McNairy, Tennessee; Roll: M593_1549; Page: 318A; Image: 641; Family History Library Film: 553048.

1880 Census: U.S Federal Census

June 17th, 1880 Tenth Civil District in McNairy County, Tennessee lists Benton Kendrick, age 37, born in Tennessee with both of his parents listed as being born in Tennessee. His occupation is listed as a farmer. He is listed as married to Francis, age 34, born in Alabama with both of her parents listed as being born in Alabama. He is enumerated with his wife, and children, Margaret M., age 8, Ida M., age 4, James W., age 2, and Dora, eight months old and John Anderson, age 27, who is listed is a laborer.

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: District 10, McNairy, Tennessee; Roll: 1268; Family History Film: 1255268; Page: 150D; Enumeration District: 125.

1900 Census: U.S Federal Census

June 23rd, 1900 Tenth Civil District in McNairy County, Tennessee lists Thomas B. Kendrick, age 57, born May 1843 in Tennessee with both of his parents listed as being born in Tennessee as well. He will have celebrated 31 years of marriage to his wife Francis, age 55, born in March 1845 in Alabama with both of her parents listed as being born in Tennessee. Thomas and Francis had five children, all living. His occupation is listed as farmer and he has worked all year on the farm. He is enumerated with his wife and child, Emmett (16), who was born June 1884 in Tennessee. Thomas and Francis, as well as their son Emmett, are all three listed as able to read, write and speak English. Thomas is listed to have own the home they live in. Farm Scheduled was listed as 183.

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Civil District 10, McNairy, Tennessee; Roll: 1586; Page: 11B; Enumeration District: 0083; FHL microfilm: 1241586.

1910 Census: U.S Federal Census

May 5th, 1910 District Number 10 in McNairy County, Tennessee, in Graham Creek, lists Benton Kendrick, age 66, born in Tennessee with both of his parents listed as being born in Tennessee as well. He will have celebrated 41 years of marriage to his wife Francis I., age 64, born in Alabama with both of her parents listed as born in Tennessee. It was the only marriage for both. His occupation is listed as a farmer on a general farm and was self-employed. Thomas and Frances had five children and as of this year only three children are listed as living. Thomas also owns his home and it is free of mortgage. He is enumerated with his wife and child, Emmett, age 26, who is working as a teacher for the Primary School.

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Civil District 10, McNairy, Tennessee; Roll: T624_1511; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 0143; FHL microfilm: 1375524.

1914 – 1920: Civil War Questionnaires

The chief purpose of the following questions is to bring out facts that will be of service in writing a true history of the Old South. Such a history has not yet been written. By answering these questions you will make a valuable contribution to the history of your State.
In case the space following any question is not sufficient for your answer, you may write your answer on a separate piece of paper. But when this is done, be sure to put the number of the question on the paper on which the answer is written, and number the paper on which you write your answer.
Read all the questions before you answer any of them. After answering the questions given, if you desire to make additional statements, I would be glad for you to add just as much as you desire.

1. State your full name and present post office address.
Thomas Benton Kendrick, Stantonville, Tenn.

2. State your age now.
Bornd May 7, 1843

3. In what State and county were you born?
McNairy County, Tenn.

4. Were you a Confederate or Federal soldier?
a Confederate

5. Name of your Company? E. comanded
(B) Number of Regiment : 19 Tenn Cavlry Commanded by __ Jef Forist

6. What was the occupation of your father?
farmer

7. Give the full name of your father Tomas Kendrick born at ___________________________ in the County of Murry State of Tennessee He lived at _______________. Give also any particulars concerning him, as official position, war services, etc.; books written by, etc.

8. Maiden name in full of your mother: Sary Carothis She was the daughter of: William and Sarn Car Who lived at ________________.

9. Remarks on ancestry. Give here any and all facts possible in reference to your parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, etc., no included in the foregoing, as where they lived, office held, Revolutionary or other war services; what country the family came from to America; where first settled, county and state; always giving full names (if possible) and never referring to an ancestor simply as such without giving the name. It is desirable to include every fact possible and to that end the full and exact record from old Bibles should be appended on separate sheets of this size, thus preserving the facts from loss.
(Left blank)

10. If you owned land or other property at the opening of the war, state what kind of property you owned, and state the value of your property as near as you can.
None

11. Did you or your parents own slaves? If so, how many?
None

12. If your parents owned land, state about how many acres.
400

13. State as near as you can the value of all the property owned by your parents, including land, when the war opened.
5000

14. What kind of house did your parents occupy? State whether it was a log house or frame house or built of other materials, and state the number of rooms it had.
Log house 2 Rumes

15. As a boy and young man, state what kind of work you did. If you worked on a farm, state to what extent you plowed, worked with a hoe, and did other kinds of similar work. (Certain historians claim that white men would not do work of this sort before the war.)
Any thing done on the farm that is all a mistake about whites not workin on the farm.

16. State clearly what kind of work you father did, and what the duties of your mother were. State all the kinds of work done in the house as well as you can remember — that is, cooking, spinning, weaving, etc.
Father did all sorts of work done on a farm. Mother done any and all sorts of work in hous keeping house work.

17. Did your parents keep any servants? If so, how many?
None

18. How was honest toil — as plowing, hauling and other sorts of honest work of this class — regarded in your community? Was such work considered respectable and honorable?
Yes and verry cheap at that

19. Did the white men in your community generally engage in such work?
Yes them that was able verr fiew was able to ___ on a count of ___

20. To what extent were there white man in your community leading lives of idleness and having other do their work for them?
Very fiew not many slavs heer

21. Did the men who owned slaves mingle freely with those who did not own slaves, or did slaveholders in any way show by their actions that they felt themselves better than respectable, honorable men who did not own slaves?
I never saw mutch diference in them as ther was not many slaves here in this parte of the cuntry

22. At the churches, at the schools, at public gatherings in general, did slaveholders and non-slaveholders mingle on a footing of equality?
___ thou had to do it.

23. Was there a friendly feeling between slaveholders and non-slaveholders in your community, or were they antagonistic to each other?
Thar was th had to be

24. In a political contest in which one candidate owned slaves and the other did not, did the fact that one candidate owned slaves help him in winning the contest?
Not mutch ther was not many slavs in this country. I no the did not alow Rebs to voat for fiv years.

25. Were the opportunities good in your community for a poor young man — honest and industrious — to save up enough to buy a small farm or go in business for himself?
I trid to but nevir did

26. Were poor, honest, industrious young men, who were ambitious to make something of themselves, encouraged or discouraged by slaveholders?
I don’t think ther was

27. What kind of school or schools did you attend?
Comen school and very little of that

28. About how long did you go to school altogether?
2 moth a year and I had the chiss then half that time

29. How far was it to the nearest school?
2 miles

30. What school or schools were in operation in your neighborhood?
(blank)

31. Was the school in you community private or public?
publick

32. About how many months in the year did it run?
2 months

33. Did the boys and girls in your community attend school pretty regularly?
All that was well

34. Was the teacher of the school you attended a man or a woman?
men

35. In what year and month and at what place did you enlist the Confederate or of the Federal Government?
The 1 of June in 1862 at garnrs ferry ___

36. After enlistment, where was your Company sent first?
I don’t remeber

37. How long after your enlistment before your Company engaged in battle?
I don’t rember

38. What was the first battle you engaged in?
Fork der river Jackson Tenn

39. State in your own way your experience in the War from this time on until the close. State where you went after the first battle — what you did, what other battles you engaged in, how long they lasted, what the results were; state how you lived in camp, how you were clothed, how you slept, what you had to eat, how you exposed to cold, hunger and disease. If you were in the hospital or in prison, state you experience here.
I cant explane how I was in the war I ___ on logs and bres piles but come out all rite at last

40. When and where were you discharged?
Corrinth Miss

41. Tell something of your trip home.
I was in ___ milds of home

42. What kind of work did you take up when you came back home?
Farming

43. Give a sketch of your life since the close of the Civil War, stating what kind of business you have engaged in, where you have lived, your church relations, etc. If you have held an office or offices state what it was. You may state here any other facts connected with your life and experience which has not been brought out the the questions.
I am a member of th Christi Churck Elder and clurk

44. On a separate sheet, five the names of some of the great men you have known or met in your time, and tell some of the circumstances of the meeting or incidents in their lives. Also add any further personal reminiscences. (Use all the space you want).
(blank)

45. Give the name of all the members of your Company you can remember: (If you know where the Roster is to be had, please make special note of this.)
The confrat the wins
J.R. Adams was third lutenet wa commanding
M.M. McKinzie
J.R. Stovall

46. Give here the NAME and POST OFFICE ADDRESS of living Veterans of the Civil War, whether members of your Company or not; whether Tennesseans or from other States.
J.R. Adams                 Selmer, Tenn
J.R. Stovall                 Bethel Springs, Tenn
M.M McKinzie        Stantonville, Tenn
T.B. Kendrick            Stantonville, Tenn
R.W. Mickey              Stantonville, Tenn
Grean Hendrix        Stantonville, Tenn

Tennessee Civil War veterans questionnaires / complied by Gustavus W. Dyer & John Trotwood Moore; editors, Colleen Morse Elliott & Louise Armstrong Moxley – Easley, S.C. : Southern Historical Press, c1985.

About the Tennessee Civil War Veterans’ Questionnaires:

The effort to record Civil War veterans’ experiences, during the conflict and before and after it, started in 1914. Dr. Gus Dyer, Tennessee State Archivist, developed a questionnaire and contacted all known living Tennessee Civil War veterans, asking them to return the questionnaires to Nashville.

In 1920 the project was continued by John Trotwood Moore of the Tennessee Historical Commission and also State Librarian and Archivist. The 1,650 completed forms were returned by 1922 and were made available for historical research.

http://www.tennessee.gov/tsla/history/military/quest.htm

1920 Census: U.S Federal Census

January 24th-26th, 1920 Census Civil District Number 10 in McNairy County, Tennessee has Benton Kendrick, age 78, born in Tennessee with both parents also listed as being born in Tennessee. Thomas is listed as living with his youngest son, Emmett A. and his wife, Hattie and their newborn Arvon on Stantonville Road. He is listed as a widower and doesn’t have an occupation listed.

Source Citation: Year: 1920; Census Place: Civil District 10, McNairy, Tennessee; Roll: T625_1753; Page: 12B; Enumeration District: 138; Image: 786.

1924 Death Record

On May 27th, 1924 at 12:20 pm Thomas Benton Kendrick passed away. His cause of death is listed as Chronic Vascular Heart Disease. He was under doctor’s care from May 1922 until the time of his death. His doctor was listed a H.C. Sanders. His birth was listed as May 7, 1843 in Tennessee and he was 80 years, 11 months and 20 days old. He was a widower. He was in life a farmer. His father was listed as Thos. Kendrick born in North Carolina and his mother was listed as Sarah Caruthers also born in North Carolina. He was buried at Clear Creek Cemetery on April 28th, 1924 (I am assuming this is a data error and it should be May 28th, 1924). Information provided for his death record was given by J.W. Kendrick (his son) from Michie Tennessee.

Source Citation: Tennessee State Library and Archives; Nashville, Tennessee; Tennessee Death Records, 1908-1959; Roll #: 170.

The Death Certificate of Thomas Benton Kendrick
The Death Certificate of Thomas Benton Kendrick

The Death Certificate of Thomas Benton Kendrick

Featured Photo by Wayne Austin, July 18, 2008.